Teaching Health and Physical Education in Australian Schools : 9780733974007
Title type
Book

Teaching Health and Physical Education in Australian Schools

By Richard Tinning, Louise McCuaig, Lisa Hunter
$90.95
In stock
Product is in stock and will be despatched within 1-2 working days.
 Add to shortlist
ISBN
9780733974007
Published date
05/12/2005
 
 
 

Description
For primary education students.

Teaching Health & Physical Education in Australian Primary Schools is an introduction to the task of teaching Health and Physical Education (HPE). It provides an account of many of the issues and concerns students will encounter as a beginning teacher working within this Key Learning Area (KLA).

This book reflects the variability and complexity in the KLA as it is represented and experienced across Australian states and territories. Accommodating a diverse range of perspectives, students can adopt and implement approaches that best serve the contexts within which they will teach health, personal development and physical education.
Product details
ISBN
 
9780733974007
Edition
 
1st
Published date
 
05/12/2005
Published by
 
Pearson Australia
Pages
 
287
Format
 
Table of contents
  • Introduction
  • SECTION A: HPE AS A KEY LEARNING AREA
  • 1. Making a certain citizen: Schooling and HPE Richard Tinning & Louise McCuaig
  • 2. Educational rationale for movement in education Toni Rossi
  • 3. Educational rationale for Health & PD in education Lori Beckett
  • 4. Why the KLA? And why now? Maree Dinan-Thompson
  • 5. What other models for curriculum are around? Ross Brooker & Anne Clennett
  • SECTION B: THE CONTEXT OF CONTEMPORARY SCHOOLING
  • 6. Whose responsibility is HPE anyway? Richard Tinning & Louise McCuaig
  • 7. HPE in the health promoting school Louise McCuaig
  • 8. Literacy issues and HPE Tony Rossi & Mary Ryan
  • 9. HPE and the ‘obesity epidemic’ Michael Gard
  • 10. HPE as risky practice: Litigation concerns Peter Swan & O’Meara
  • 11. Special considerations for HPE in rural schools Tony Rossi
  • SECTION C: THE STUDENT IN SCHOOL
  • 12. New kids in new times/ Consuming kids Richard Tinning & Lisa Hunter
  • 13. Young people, embodied learning and HPE Lisa Hunter
  • 14. Pleasure or pain: student’s perspectives on HPE Lisa Hunter
  • SECTION D: IMPLEMENTING HPE
  • 15. Time Out: Planning from outcomes Louise McCuaig
  • Curriculum issues
  • 16. Pursuing HPE outcomes through health education Mike Brown & Ben Dyson
  • 17. Pursuing HPE outcomes through outdoor education Lyn Harrison & Deana Leahy
  • 18. Pursuing HPE outcomes through personal development education Lori Beckett
  • 19. Pursuing HPE outcomes through physical education Peter Hay
  • 20. Pursuing HPE outcomes through sport education & school sport Dawn Penney
  • Issues in pedagogy
  • 21. Thinking about good teaching in physical education? Richard Tinning
  • 22. Integrating learning Richard Tinning & Lisa Hunter
  • 23. Teaching for inclusivity Robyn Garrett & Alison Wrench
  • 24. Making sense of teaching skills and games Justen O’Connor
  • Issues in assessment & reporting
  • 25. Assessment and reporting of learning outcomes in HPE Trish Glasby
  • 26. Assessment for accountability Peter Hay
  • SECTION E: ISSUES IN BEING A (STUDENT) TEACHER
  • 27. Class ‘control and management’ Richard Tinning
  • 28. Reflecting on your teaching Richard Tinning
Features & benefits
  • Case studies provide students with unique insight into issues and scenarios in the classroom
  • End chapter summaries give students a chance to review what they have learnt.
  • Review discussions prompt discussion amongst students
  • Further reading & References
Author biography
Dr Richard Tinning is a Professor in Pedagogy, Chair of the School Internationalisation Committee and Coordinator of Postgraduate Coursework Studies at the School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland.
Dr Lisa Hunter is a lecturer at the School of Education, Griffith University
Ms Louise McCuaig is an Associate Lecturer in Pedagogy & Health Education at the School of Human Movement Studies, University of Queensland