Title type
Book

Twenty Studies That Revolutionized Child Psychology (2e)

By Wallace Dixon
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ISBN
9780205948031
Published date
06/03/2015
 
 
 

Description
For undergraduate courses in Child Development/Psychology, Life Span Development, Child and Family Studies, and Human Growth and Development

Twenty Studies That Revolutionized Child Psychology gives students a systematic look at the process of child psychology research by examining the twenty most revolutionary scientific investigations in the field over the course of the last fifty years. For the second edition, author and child psychologist Wallace Dixon polled an expanded number of experts in the field to determine the most important studies to be included. The result is an updated collection of revolutionary studies that helps students to better understand the discipline of child psychology.
Product details
ISBN
 
9780205948031
Edition
 
2nd
Published date
 
06/03/2015
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
288
Format
 
Table of contents
1. Introduction

PART I: FOUR STUDIES THAT REVOLUTIONIZED COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT
2. From Mollusks to Rugrats: Biological Principles and Psychological Ideas.
3. Piaget, J. (1962).  Play, dreams and imitation in childhood.  New York: Norton.
4. Vygotsky, L.S. (1978).  Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes.  Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
5. Baillargeon, R., Spelke, E.S., & Wasserman, S. (1985).  Object permanence in five-month-old infants.  Cognition, 20, 191-208.    
6. Thelen, E., & Ulrich, B.D. (1991).  Hidden skills: A dynamic systems analysis of treadmill stepping during the first year.  Monographs of the Society for Research in Child Development, 56, (1, Serial No. 223).

PART II: FIVE STUDIES THAT REVOLUTIONIZED PERCEPTUAL AND LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
7. Gibson, E.J., & Walk, R.D. (1960).  The “visual cliff.”  Scientific American, 202, 64-71.
8. Fantz, R.L. (1961).  The origin of form perception.  Scientific American, 204, 66-73.
9. Hubel, D.H., & Wiesel, T.N. (1962).  Receptive fields, binocular interaction and functional architecture in the cat’s visual cortex. The Journal of Physiology, 160, 106-154.
10. Werker, J.F., & Tees, R.C. (1984).  Cross-language speech perception: Evidence for perceptual reorganization during the first year of life.  Infant Behavior and Development, 7, 49-63.
11. Saffran, J.R., Aslin, R.N., & Newport, E.L. (1996).  Statistical learning by 8-month-old infants.  Science, 274, 1926-1928.

PART III: FOUR STUDIES THAT REVOLUTIONIZED SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
12. Bandura, A., Ross, D., & Ross, S. A. (1961). Transmission of aggression through imitation of aggressive models. Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology, 63, 575-582.
13. Meltzoff, A.N., & Moore, M.K. (1977).  Imitation of facial and manual gestures by human neonates.  Science, 198, 75-79.
14. Bronfenbrenner, U. (1977).  Toward an experimental ecology of human development.  American Psychologist, 32, 513-531.
15. Mischel, W., Shoda, Y., & Rodriguez, M.I. (1989).  Delay of gratification in children. Science, 244, 933-938.

PART IV: SEVEN STUDIES THAT REVOLUTIONIZED PARENTING AND CLINICAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY
16. Harlow, H.F., & Harlow, M.K. (1965).  The affectional systems.  In A. Schrier, H.F. Harlow, & F. Stollnitz (Eds.), Behavior of nonhuman primates:  Modern research trends.  New York:  Academic Press.
17. Bowlby, J. (1969).  Attachment and loss, Vol. 1: Attachment. New York: Basic Books.
18. Ainsworth, M. D. S., Blehar, M. C., Waters, E., & Wall, S. (1979). Patterns of attachment: A psychological study of the strange situation. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
19. Thomas, A., Chess, S., & Birch, H.G. (1968). Temperament and behavior disorders in childhood.  New York: New York University Press.
20. Baumrind, D. (1971).  Current patterns of parental authority.  Developmental Psychology Monographs, 4 (1, part 2).
21. DeCasper, A.J., & Fifer, W.P. (1980).  Of human bonding:  Newborns prefer their mothers’ voices.  Science, 208, 1174-1176.
22. Baron-Cohen, S., Leslie, A.M., & Frith, U. (1985).  Does the autistic child have a “theory of mind”?  Cognition, 21, 37-46.
New to this edition
• For the second edition, author and child psychologist Wallace Dixon polled an expanded number of experts in the field to determine the most important studies to be included. The result is an updated collection of revolutionary studies that helps students to better understand the discipline of child psychology.
Features & benefits
A detailed description of each of the 20 individual studies provides students with an understanding of the ingenious methodological innovations of researchers, and of the revolutionizing impacts that such research has had on the development of the field.
 
• The inclusion of biographical information relevant to the researchers' efforts fosters student interest in the inner workings of science, child psychology, and to the human-ness of the researchers themselves.

• Author Wallace Dixon used empirical research obtained from a random sampling of teachers, scholars, and journal editors in the field to determine which studies to include in the text. This methodology eliminates Dixon’s own biases and experiences, and allows the field of child psychology to speak for itself.

Student-friendly language throughout the text invites students to become a part of the process of learning, and speaks to rather than at them.