Engineering Mechanics: Statics (13e) : 9780132915540

Engineering Mechanics: Statics (13e)

 
Edition
 
13th
ISBN
 
9780132915540
ISBN 10
 
0132915545
Published
 
12/01/2012
Published by
 
Pearson Higher Ed USA
Pages
 
672
Format
 
Out of stock
 
Title type
Book
$222.95
 
 
 
Description

In his revision of Engineering Mechanics, R.C. Hibbeler empowers students to succeed in the whole learning experience. Hibbeler achieves this by calling on his everyday classroom experience and his knowledge of how students learn inside and outside of lecture.

 

MasteringEngineering, the most technologically advanced online tutorial and homework system available, can be packaged with this edition. 

Table of contents

1 General Principles 3        

Chapter Objectives 3

1.1 Mechanics 3

1.2 Fundamental Concepts 4

1.3 Units of Measurement 7

1.4 T he International System of Units 9

1.5 Numerical Calculations 10

1.6 General Procedure for Analysis 12

 

2 Force Vectors 17

Chapter Objectives 17

2.1 Scalars and Vectors 17

2.2 Vector Operations 18

2.3 Vector Addition of Forces 20

2.4 Addition of a System of Coplanar Forces 32

2.5 C artesian Vectors 43

2.6 Addition of Cartesian Vectors 46

2.7 Position Vectors 56

2.8 Force Vector Directed Along a Line 59

2.9 Dot Product 69

 

3 Equilibrium of a Particle 85

Chapter Objectives 85

3.1 Condition for the Equilibrium of a Particle 85

3.2 The Free-Body Diagram 86

3.3 Coplanar Force Systems 89

3.4 Three-Dimensional Force Systems 103

 

4 Force System Resultants 117

Chapter Objectives 117

4.1 Moment of a Force–Scalar Formulation 117

4.2 Cross Product 121

4.3 Moment of a Force–Vector Formulation 124

4.4 Principle of Moments 128

4.5 Moment of a Force about a Specified Axis 139

4.6 Moment of a Couple 148

4.7 Simplification of a Force and Couple System 160

4.8 Further Simplification of a Force and Couple System 170

4.9 Reduction of a Simple Distributed Loading 183

 

5 Equilibrium of a Rigid Body 199

Chapter Objectives 199

5.1 Conditions for Rigid-Body Equilibrium 199

5.2 Free-Body Diagrams 201

5.3 Equations of Equilibrium 214

5.4 Two- and Three-Force Members 224

5.5 Free-Body Diagrams 237

5.6 Equations of Equilibrium 242

5.7 Constraints and Statical Determinacy 243

 

6 Structural Analysis 263

Chapter Objectives 263

6.1 Simple Trusses 263

6.2 The Method of Joints 266

6.3 Zero-Force Members 272

6.4 The Method of Sections 280

6.5 Space Trusses 290

6.6 Frames and Machines 294

 

7 Internal Forces 331

Chapter Objectives 331

7.1 Internal Loadings Developed in Structural Members 331

7.2 Shear and Moment Equations and Diagrams 347

7.3 Relations between Distributed Load, Shear, and Moment 356

7.4 Cables 367

 

8 Friction 389

Chapter Objectives 389

8.1 Characteristics of Dry Friction 389

8.2 Problems Involving Dry Friction 394

8.3 Wedges 416

8.4 Frictional Forces on Screws 418

8.5 Frictional Forces on Flat Belts 425

8.6 Frictional Forces on Collar Bearings, Pivot Bearings, and Disks 433

8.7 Frictional Forces on Journal Bearings 436

8.8 Rolling Resistance 438

 

9 Center of Gravity and Centroid 451

Chapter Objectives 451

9.1 Center of Gravity, Center of Mass, and the Centroid of a Body 451

9.2 Composite Bodies 474

9.3 Theorems of Pappus and Guldinus 488

9.4 Resultant of a General Distributed Loading 497

9.5 Fluid Pressure 498

 

10 Moments of Inertia 515        

Chapter Objectives 515

10.1 Definition of Moments of Inertia for Areas 515

10.2 Parallel-Axis Theorem for an Area 516

10.3 Radius of Gyration of an Area 517

10.4 Moments of Inertia for Composite Areas 526

10.5 Product of Inertia for an Area 534

10.6 Moments of Inertia for an Area about Inclined Axes 538

10.7 Mohr’s Circle for Moments of Inertia 541

10.8 Mass Moment of Inertia 549

 

11 Virtual Work 567

Chapter Objectives 567

11.1 Definition of Work 567

11.2 Principle of Virtual Work 569

11.3 Principle of Virtual Work for a System of Connected Rigid Bodies 571

11.4 Conservative Forces 583

11.5 Potential Energy 584

11.6 Potential-Energy Criterion for Equilibrium 586

11.7 Stability of Equilibrium Configuration 587 Appendix

 

A. Mathematical Review and Expressions

Fundamental Problems Partial Solutions and Answers

Answers to Selected Problems

Index

New to this edition
New Problems. There are approximately 35% or about 410 new problems in this edition. These new problems relate to applications in many different fields of engineering. Also, a significant increase in algebraic type problems has been added, so that a generalized solution can be obtained.
 
Additional Fundamental Problems. These problem sets serve as extended example problems since their solutions are given in the back of the book. Additional problems have been added, especially in the areas of frames and machines, and in friction.

Expanded Solutions.
Some of the fundamental problems now have more detailed solutions, including some artwork, for better clarification. Also, some of the more difficult problems have additional hints along with its answer when given in the back of the book.

Updated Photos. The relevance of knowing the subject matter is reflected by the realistic applications depicted by the many photos placed throughout the book. In this edition 20 new or updated photos are included. These, along with all the others, are generally used to explain how the relevant principles of mechanics apply to real-world situations. In some sections they are incorporated into the example problems, or to show how to model then draw the free-body diagram of an actual object.

New & Revised Example Problems. Throughout the book examples have been altered or enhanced in an attempt to help clarify concepts for students. Where appropriate new examples have been added in order to emphasize important concepts that were needed.

New Conceptual Problems.
The conceptual problems given at the end of many of the problem sets are intended to engage the students in thinking through a real-life situation as depicted in a photo. They can be assigned either as individual or team projects after the students have developed some expertise in the subject matter.
Features & benefits

Problem Solving

R.C. Hibbeler’s text features a large variety of problem types from a broad range of engineering disciplines, stressing practical, realistic situations encountered in professional practice, varying levels of difficulty, and problems that involve solution by computer.

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Fundamental Problems. These problem sets follow the example problems. They offer students simple applications of the concepts and, therefore, provide them with the chance to develop their problem-solving skills before attempting to solve any of the standard problems that follow. You may consider these problems as extended examples since they all have partial solutions and answers that are given in the back of the book.

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Conceptual Problems. Throughout the text, usually at the end of each chapter, there is a set of problems that involve conceptual situations related to the application of the mechanics principles contained in the chapter. These analysis and design problems are intended to engage the students in thinking through a real-life situation as depicted in a photo.

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Procedures for Analysis. This feature provides students with a logical and orderly method for applying theory and building problem solving skills. A general procedure for analyzing any mechanical problem is presented at the end of the first chapter. Then this procedure is customized to relate to specific types of problems that are covered throughout the book.

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Examples. Designed to help students who “learn by example”, R.C. Hibbeler’s Examples illustrate the application of fundamental theory to practical engineering problems and reflect problem solving strategies discussed in associated Procedures for Analysis.

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Important Points. This feature provides a review or summary of the most important concepts in a section and highlights the most significant points that should be realized when applying the theory to solve problems.

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Emphasis on Free-Body Diagrams. Drawing a free-body diagram is particularly important when solving problems, and for this reason this step is strongly emphasized throughout the book. In particular, special sections and examples are devoted to show how to draw free-body diagrams. Specific homework problems have also been added to develop this practice.

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General Analysis and Design Problems. The majority of problems in the book depict realistic situations encountered in engineering practice. Some of these problems come from actual products used in industry. It is hoped that this realism will both stimulate the student’s interest in engineering mechanics and provide a means for developing the skill to reduce any such problem from its physical description to a model or symbolic representation to which the principles of mechanics may be applied.

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Student Study Pack. This supplement contains chapter-by-chapter study materials, a Free-Body Diagram Workbook and access to the Companion Website.

Part I - A chapter-by-chapter review including key points, equations, and check up questions.

Part II - Free Body Diagram workbook — 75 pages that step students through numerous free body diagram problems. Full explanations and solutions are provided.

Access Code - www.prenhall.com/hibbeler, a pass code protected website that includes:

¿¿¿¿-Video Solutions - complete, step-by-step solution walkthroughs of representative homework problems

¿¿¿¿-Over 1000 statics/dynamics problems with solutions that contain both math and associated free body diagrams

¿¿¿¿- MATLAB® and Mathcad mechanics tutorials keyed to the text, and mechanics AVIs and simulations.

Statics Practice Problem Workbook. This workbook contains additional worked problems. The problems are partially solved and are designed to help guide students through difficult topics.

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Visualization

PhotoRealistic Art — 3D figures rendered with photographic quality

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Photographs.¿ Many photographs are used throughout the book to explain how the principles of mechanics apply to real-world situation. In some section, photographs have been used to show how engineers must first make an idealized model for analysis and then proceed to draw a free-body diagram of this model in order to apply the theory. Most photographs were taken by the author, and include appropriate vectors and notation illustrating a mechanics concept.

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Illustrations. These figures provide a strong connection to the 3-D nature of engineering. Particular attention has also been paid to providing a view of any physical object, its dimensions, and the vectors in a manner that can be easily understood.

Review and Student Support

End of Chapter Review.¿ A thorough end of chapter review includes each important point accompanied by the relevant equation and art from the chapter providing the students a concise tool for reviewing chapter contents.

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MasteringEngineering. The most technologically advanced online tutorial and homework system. MasteringEngineering is designed to provide students with customized coaching and individualized feedback to help improve problem-solving skills while providing instructors with rich teaching diagnostics.

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Video Solutions. Developed by Professor Edward Berger, University of Virginia, video solutions are located on the Companion Website for the text and offer step-by-step solution walkthroughs of representative homework problems from each section of the text.

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Student Study Pack. This supplement contains chapter-by-chapter study materials, a Free-Body Diagram Workbook and access to the Companion Website.

Part I - A chapter-by-chapter review including key points, equations, and check up questions.

Part II - Free Body Diagram workbook — 75 pages that step students through numerous free body diagram problems. Full explanations and solutions are provided.

Access Code - www.prenhall.com/hibbeler, a pass code protected website that includes:

¿¿¿¿-Video Solutions - complete, step-by-step solution walkthroughs of representative homework problems

¿¿¿¿-Over 1000 statics/dynamics problems with solutions that contain both math and associated free body diagrams

¿¿¿¿- MATLAB® and Mathcad mechanics tutorials keyed to the text, and mechanics AVIs and simulations.

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Author biography

R.C. Hibbeler graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana with a BS in Civil Engineering (major in Structures) and an MS in Nuclear Engineering. He obtained his PhD in Theoretical and Applied Mechanics from Northwestern University.

Hibbeler’s professional experience includes postdoctoral work in reactor safety and analysis at Argonne National Laboratory, and structural work at Chicago Bridge and Iron, as well as Sargent and Lundy in Tucson. He has practiced engineering in Ohio, New York, and Louisiana.

Hibbeler currently teaches at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette. In the past he has taught at the University of Illinois at Urbana, Youngstown State University, Illinois Institute of Technology, and Union College.

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